Bay Area Real Estate Homes For Sale Graphic  
 
 
~ BAY AREA CITIES ~
  Alameda Real Estate  
  Albany Real Estate  
  Berkeley Real Estate  
  Concord Real Estate  
  Castro Valley Real Estate  
  El Cerrito Real Estate  
  El Sobrante Real Estate  
  Emeryville Real Estate  
  Hayward Real Estate  
  Hercules Real Estate  
  Lafayette Real Estate  
  Oakland Real Estate  
  Orinda Real Estate  
  Piedmont Real Estate  
  Pinole Real Estate  
  Pleasant Hill Real Estate  
  Richmond Real Estate  
  Rodeo Real Estate  
  San Leandro Real Estate  
  San Lorenzo Real Estate  
  Union City Real Estate  
  Walnut Creek Real Estate  
 
 

Real estate Technology glossary

Welcome to Your Bay Area Real Estate Technology Guide. This page is designed to help people understand real estate tech terms and definitions. Team Enterprise is constantly striving to find new ways to bring value to our clients and provide excellent service. Drop us a line and let us know what you might find of value. Take a look around this site and find Homes For Sale, Commercial Buildings, Income Properties, Lots and Land and much more. We look forward to hearing from you!

Real Estate Technology Glossary

A

Actions - What an e-mail client software system must do every time a rule is activated - i.e. when messages come from eProNAR.InternetCrusade.com, file them in the e-PRO folder. (file them in the e-PRO folder is the action).

Address book - Address book is a facility in most e-mail client software that allows the user to store address information for their contacts - recalling and using the addresses as needed.

Adobe Acrobat - A series of applications from Adobe Systems that enables the user to create and view graphically-oriented documents (such as catalogs, flyers, instruction manuals, presentations) and to send these to recipients who can open them in turn.

Aggregators - A company that combines and offers for distribution a number of services or suite of products, usually from a variety of partners. In this context, aggregators are those companies that combine listing information from a number of sources (mostly MLS's).

Always on broadband connection - Cable and DSL services that allow the user to remain connected to the Internet at all times.

Analog - Almost everything in the world can be described or represented in one of two forms: analog or digital. The principal feature of analog representations is that they are continuous. In contrast, digital representations consist of values measured at discrete intervals.

AOL - America Online

Aperture - A usually-adjustable opening in an optical instrument, such as a camera or telescope that limits the amount of light passing through a lens or onto a mirror.

Appliance - In this context, any device that allows for connection to the Internet and the Web - including palmtops, WebTV, thin client systems, web-enabled cell phones.

Application program - An executable - Program files that perform an 'execution' of code when they are activated, without requiring another application's intervention. Once an executable is activated, it will take action on its own. This is in opposition to data files that require application programs to open them.

Arbitration- The process by which the parties to a dispute submit their differences to the judgment of an impartial person or group appointed by mutual consent or statutory provision.

ARPANET - Advanced Research Projects Agency Network. The precursor to the Internet, ARPANET was a large wide-area network created by the United States Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) in 1969.

ASCII Text - Also called plain text - text without formatting characters.

Associated application - The application that Windows will use to open a specific file type, based on default settings or the settings you have entered.

Atoms - New slang that refers to hard copy, printed material.

Attachment - Any file attached to an e-mail message.

Authentication - The process of identifying an individual usually based on a username and password.

Auto-dialers - Computerized devices that automate the dialing of telephone numbers

Auto-filling - When the user begins to type and the software recognizes a letter pattern, using it to fill in the rest of the word or phrase, this is commonly called auto-filling.

Auto-responder content - Content you have made available in your auto-responder.

Auto-responder - An e-mail facility that allows you to automatically respond to incoming messages with a predetermined reply. This facility is useful when you wish to make the same information available to all who want it.

Auto reply - An e-mail client function that automatically sends a reply message to people who send messages to it.

Auto-signature - A text file appended automatically to an e-mail message.

.avi - Short for Audio Video Interleave, the file format for Microsoft's Video for Windows standard.

B

Backdoor virus - Certain viruses and "worms" that enter through an undocumented way of gaining access to a program, online service or an entire computer system. The backdoor is written by the programmer who creates the code for the program and is often only known by the programmer. A backdoor is a potential security risk.

Backup device - Any device that enables the user to create restorable copies of hard disk contents.

Bandwidth - The amount of data that can be transmitted in a given amount of time (usually stated in bits per second -bps).

Baseline - The starting point - minimum set of capabilities.

Beaming - Transporting digital information from one device to another by means of infrared beam technology.

bmp - A bit map (often spelled "bitmap") defines a display space and the color for each pixel or "bit" in the display space.

Bookmark - Nearly all Web browsers support a bookmarking feature that lets you save the address (URL) of a Web page so that you can easily re-visit the page at a later time.

Broadband - Maximized data transmission by using several channels on a single wire or medium.

Brochure ware - Use of the World Wide Web facilities to produce graphical quality business and personal brochures - a web site that contains mostly personal or company information.

Brokerage firm - A real estate company operated under the laws of a State, usually with a single responsible broker/owner or corporate license.

Browser - Software built on the Mosaic model that allows for translation of http, html, and other web technologies. The software that allows a user to view and surf web sites.

Browser window - The visible area within the Web Browser.

Buyer customer - A party to a real estate transaction who receives information, services, or benefits but has no contractual relationship with a REALTOR® or broker and a firm.

C

Cable - Referring to fiber optic cable and its use in connecting users and networks to the Internet through fiber optic connections. Cable is a relatively fast way to connect to the Internet.

Cable connectivity - Connection to the Internet through the cable modem to the fiber optic cable system.

Cable modems - Modems that communicate between the user and the ISP through the fiber optic cable network.

CD-ROM - Compact Disc, Read-Only Memory - A compact disc used to store and play back computer data instead of digital audio.

Central office (CO) - The central telephone office a DSL user will be connecting to - usually must be less than 20,000 feet away

Certification - The e-PRO Certification Course is an educational program unlike any other professional certification or designation course available, comprehensive and Interactive. It is sponsored by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of REALTORS® and is specifically designed to help real estate professionals thrive in the competitive world of online real estate. In addition, the e-PRO Certification Course is geared to insure continued success in online real estate after the course has been completed and certification earned, by online participation in the e-PRO Community and the e-PRO Referral Network.

cgi - Common Gateway Interface - CGI programs are the most common way for Web servers to interact dynamically with users. Many HTML pages that contain forms, for example, use a CGI program to process the form's data once it's submitted.

Character count - The total number of characters in a given field or file.

Clean connection - Access to the network that is characterized by limited or no line noise, no dropped lines and up-line/down-line transmissions at or close to capacity.

Client - the person(s) or entity with whom a REALTOR,®  broker or a REALTOR®'s firm has an agency or legally-recognized non-agency relationship.

Clip - A small amount of an original message's text that is clipped and pasted into a reply to give some context to the reply.

Community - Used in tandem with 'virtual communities' - offers people with similar experiences and interests the opportunity to come together, freed from the restraints of time and space to form meaningful relationships.

Community web publishing tool - a web interface that facilitates the publishing of community-related information by visitors to the web site.

Compilation - Compiled data set.

Compiled data - Individual data sets that are aggregated and interpolated into a single fully analyzed data set.

Conditions - In this context, certain parameters that an e-mail message must meet before it is acted on by a rule.

Connected Consumer - The modern consumer who is connected to the Internet and expects to conduct business communications via e-mail and the Web.

Confirmation message - An auto reply that lets communicants know that you did, in fact, receive their message and will respond at some future time.

Contact management system - Also referred to as Customer Relationship Managers (CRM) and Personal Information Managers (PIM) - software that helps the user store and manage information about all of the people they come in contact with. . . Including clients, prospects, associates, service vendors, etc.

Corporate network (T1/T3) - Corporate networks, usually LANs running some form of Ethernet, can offer Internet access through 1.544Mbps access.

CRM - Acronym for Customer Relationship Management. CRM entails all aspects of interaction a company has with its customer, whether it be sales or service-related.

CRM/PIM - Personal Information Manager - Programs that are designed to assist the user in management of contacts, appointments, activities, documents, notes and more. CRM is an acronym for customer relationship management. CRM entails all aspects of interaction a company has with its customer, whether it is sales or service related.

Cursor - In this context, the cursor is the icon that identifies the location on the screen or in the document that your system is focused on. Any action taken (i.e. typing over) will take place at the cursor location.

Customer - a party to a real estate transaction who receives information, services, or benefits but has no contractual relationship with the REALTOR,® broker or the REALTOR®'s firm.

Customization - Making changes to the settings for a software system so that it behaves the way you want it to in the new default mode you define.

D

Data sets - All of the information relating to a particular record constitutes one data set.

Database - Technology that allows you to store and retrieve related records and data items. In this context, database refers to the ability to store contact information, including names and e-mail addresses.

Dedicated service - Usually refers to an Internet access point that is only available to users on a local area network and usually provides for T1 or T3 connectivity.

Deep linking - linking to any location within a web site other than the home page.

Default - Those settings established by the manufacturer that, if you do nothing to change them, will be part of the software.

Desktop - The main screen or view in the Windows environment.

Desktop computer - Your main computer - usually not a portable.

Desktop publishing - Software applications that allow the user to create publication-quality documents.

Dial up - Internet access that requires the use of POTS (Plain old telephone system) lines and relatively slow modems (usually equal to or less than 56kbps).

Dial-up networking wizard. - A program in Microsoft Windows that steps the user through the information gathering and setup to create an Internet connection through the user's ISP

Differentiator - Those characteristics that make you unique.

Digest - Multiple Listserv messages compiled and sent in a single message. A digest will often have a table of contents that introduces the topics presented in each compiled message.

Digest format - Multiple Listserv messages compiled and sent in a single message. A digest will often have a table of contents that introduces the topics presented in each compiled message.

Digest version - Listserv that compiles a group of messages into a digest before sending it out to the recipients.

Digital cameras - Cameras that store images on digital media for later use in computerized imagery, on web pages, for printing on personal printers and electronic forwarding to processing facilities.

Digital data - Anything (including data) that has been digitized has been converted from its native form (text as an example) into digital form (machine readable).

Digital images - Images converted from traditional analog format to digital (machine-readable) format.

Digitized video - Video stored in machine-readable format.

Distribution list - See 'groups'

DNS servers - An Internet service that translates domain names into IP addresses. Because domain names are alphabetic, they're easier to remember. The Internet however, is really based on IP addresses.

Docking station - A peripheral device that allows the user to slip a notebook computer into a preconfigured slot that instantly attaches full keyboard, monitor, printer, mouse and more to make the notebook more desktop-like.

Domain - A set of computers or networks sharing a common IP address

Domain host - The company providing the servers on which your domain name is made available to the Internet and where your domain pointers reside.

Domain Name Servers - Those servers where your domain will be located on the Internet - a primary and a secondary server for locating your domain.

Dotcom - A new slang used to describe or refer to the world of the Internet. Internet-centric companies are often referred to as dotcom companies. Internet-company employees are often called dot comers. The term is derived from the most widely-held top level domain (TLD), the .com domain.

Double-clicking - Pressing the mouse's right or left button to create different commands.

Dr. Denis Waitley - Denis Waitley is one of the most respected keynote lecturers and productivity consultants in the world. He has helped millions of individuals become winners. He has studied and counseled leaders in every field from "Fortune 500" top executives to managers of multinational corporations, from NASA astronauts to Super bowl and Olympic champions, from heads of government to family and youth group.

Drag and drop - Technology that enables the user to click the mouse over an item, drag the item to a new location and drop it into that location.

DSL - Digital Subscriber Line. DSL uses existing copper telephone transmission lines to connect users to the Internet via a central office switching node. DSL users can realize as much as 32 Mbps for downstream traffic, and from 32 Kbps to over 1 Mbps for up.

E

E-commerce - electronic commerce - a term referring to the movement of traditional financial transactions from their physical bounds to an electronic platform - such as the Internet and the web.

E-Fax - Web service that enables you to send and receive facsimile from e-mail.

Electronic bulletin board - Refers to a web site where visitors can go to post messages, read messages and reply to messages in a threaded, conversational fashion.

Electronic envelope - The 'wrapper' that contains a transmitted packet of data - including the data itself and the header and routing information.

Electronic Newsletter - The creation of and scheduled delivery through e-mail of one's professional newsletter. These can be as simple as a plain-text e-mail message or as elegant as a full web site. Usually a newsletter should be written in a format that all recipients would be able to read (text).

Electronic users' group - A new phenomenon - use of the Internet for product users to be able to gather (electronically) and share insight and issues related to specific products. Thus creating power as a result of their number.

E-mail client - The user-level program that allows the user to access SMTP and POP functions in the Virtual Post Office of their ISP or other e-mail service.

E-mail forwarding - The ability to automatically forward incoming messages from your permanent e-mail address to your current ISP for retrieval.

E-mail inbox - That portion of the POP server where your incoming e-mail messages are accessed and downloaded.

E-mail overload - When one receives so much e-mail in a timeframe that it becomes impossible to correctly read, absorb and act upon that mail.

E-mail presence - The total marketing effort, including and emphasizing branding, you create using e-mail techniques including opt-in newsletters, Listserv participation, e-mail signatures, auto responders.

E-mail signatures - Most e-mail systems allow the user to store one or more text files that can be appended to each outgoing message. This is commonly used for personal information, including name, phone numbers and e-mail address.

Embedded link - A hyperlink inserted (embedded) in a message or in a document.

Emoticons (smiley’s) - Emoticons are text-graphical combinations that can add certain emotional inflections to an otherwise flat e-mail message.

e-PRO Certification - - The e-PRO Certification Course is an educational program unlike any other professional certification or designation course available, comprehensive and Interactive. It is sponsored by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of REALTORS® and is specifically designed to help real estate professionals thrive in the competitive world of online real estate. In addition, the e-PRO Certification Course is geared to ensure continued success in online real estate after the course has been completed and certification earned, by online participation in the e-PRO Community and the e-PRO Referral Network.

Ethernet - A local-area network (LAN) protocol developed in 1976 by Xerox Corporation in cooperation with DEC and Intel.

E-transaction - When all participants in a transaction communicate, pass documents, share schedules and approvals totally through Internet communications - effectively speeding up the process.

Executable files - Program files that perform an 'execution' of code when they are activated, without requiring another application's intervention. Once an executable is activated, it will take action on its own. This is in opposition with data files that require application programs to open them.

Extranet - Closed or severely restricted access to all or part of a company's web site - usually reserved for customers and usually requiring password authentication.

F

Facility - In this context, the physical site where your servers are located - including all security features, access restrictions, backup and restore capabilities etc.

Favorite - web pages that you have saved a link to within the facilities of your web browser for rapid retrieval.

File size restriction - In this context, many ISPs restrict the size of any particular e-mail message. Often this can be as small as 1MB. The message and any attachments, when broken into packets and wrapped in envelopes, will grow significantly in size. This can have a dramatic effect on the size of attachments that your recipients can receive.

Flame - An e-mail message sent to the Listserv that is especially harsh in its treatment of another member or members of the Listserv community.

Floppy disk - Relatively old storage media - floppy disks usually contain 1.44MB of data on a rewriteable disk.

Folders - The Microsoft Windows method of storage and retrieval on a hard disk.

Follow-me phone number - Telephony services that allow you to program an 800 number to forward calls to any number you select.

Formatting bar - This refers to those tools in an e-mail client that offer such capabilities that make it possible to format message text type, fonts, character size and enhancement, message width and more - as represented in a toolbar.

Framing - Bringing content from an outside web document into your site within a sub-window of the browser. Dividing the browser display area into separate sections, each of which is really a different web page. The net effect is to link your site to the content of another site while still keeping a part of your site on the screen.

Free reports - Compiled reports that you make available to web visitors - could include school information, MLS statistics, demographics.

ftp - File Transfer Protocol - a method and protocol for transferring files from one point to another - typically used to upload files to a server.

Full-featured e-mail account - An e-mail POP account with features such as unlimited addressing, web-based access and auto-reply messages.

Functionality - Those features and settings of your e-mail software that customize the system for your use.

G

gif - stands for Graphics Interchange Format, a bit-mapped graphics file format used by web designers.

Gigabyte hard drive - A way of measuring hard drive size in terms of how many gigabytes of data it can hold. A gigabyte is 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Gigabytes - One gigabyte is equal to 1, 073,741,824 bytes.

Goals statement - A written statement that details exactly what success of a plan should look like - in measureable results.

GPS - The Global Positioning System is a satellite navigation system used to determine terrestrial position, velocity, and time. Once exclusively used by the U.S. military, the GPS is now available to the worldwide general public. The GPS system relays satellite signals that can be processed by a GPS receiver.

Group message - An e-mail facility that allows you to create 'groups' of recipients (i.e. all past clients) and send a single message to all of them at once by sending it to the group.

Groups - Lists of e-mail contacts and addresses that you have determined belong grouped together for your mass mailing purposes.

H

Handheld calculator applications - Applications on handheld devices that perform standard and scientific calculator functions.

Handheld Device - Term currently interchangeable with Palmtop Device. Refers to those computing devices that are small enough to fit the palm of your hand. This is now expanded to include sub-notebook computers. Same as a handheld organizer.

Handheld organizer - Term currently interchangeable with Palmtop Device. Refers to those computing devices that are small enough to fit the palm of your hand. This is now expanded to include sub-notebook computers.

Hardened data center - Ultra-secure facilities maintained by 24 x 7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) on-site personnel, and each contain backup and disaster recovery systems to insure the safety and availability of customers' applications, services, and data.

Header - A unit of information that precedes a piece of data - in this context, a packet. E-mail headers are used to identify source, destination and other important information about a packet so that it can become reassembled as a message at the recipient location.

High priority - Many e-mail clients allow you to assign priority to a message. A high priority says, in effect, "IMPORTANT - Read Now!"

Home buying process - Those specific steps required to move through the process of finding available properties, negotiating terms with the seller, performing inspections, arranging finances, closing and recording the transaction within the law and under generally accepted practices and principles

Home page - The first page of a web site that the visitor lands on.

Hosted - When a domain is registered to and located on a specific server, it is referred to as being "hosted" on that server.

Hotlink - A link embedded in a message or in a document that will, when clicked, transport the user to another location or will activate a program. AKA hotlink, link.

Hot-port - Technology that allows the user to swap different devices on a port without being required to stop the system's operation. USB is a prime example of hot-port usage.

HTML – Hyper Text Markup Language - the programming format that creates hyperlinks and hypermedia on web pages.

Hybridization - Convergence of many different devices into a single configuration - such as cellular phone/PDA/Camera combinations.

Hyperlink - A link embedded in a message or in a document that will, when clicked, transport the user to another location or will activate a program.

I

Icon - A small picture or image that represents an object, a folder, or a program.

Image editing - Software that enables the user to make often sophisticated changes to digital images - such as sharpen, resize, recolor, and much more.

Immediate - Listserv that sends you each posting as it comes in - immediately. Same as immediate version.

Immediate version - Listserv that sends you each posting as it comes in - immediately.

Incompatibility - In this context, referring to a file that is not able to be opened with existing application software on the user's computer

Independent contractor - Licensed real estate professional working under the license of a brokerage in such a manner as to be able to operate independently and with little or no management being applied by the brokerage. Typically, Independent contractors are not salaried employees.

Information Commanders - One whose ability to gather, manipulate, report and analyze many forms of information through the use of modern technology is above the norm

Information Superhighway - Monday March 21, 1994, U.S. Vice President Al Gore described to the International Telecom Union the need to create a Global Information Infrastructure (GII) that would be based on five principles: First, encourage private investment; Second, promote competition; Third, create a flexible regulatory framework that can keep pace with rapid technological and market changes; Fourth, provide open access to the network for all information providers; and Fifth, insure universal service.

Instant Messenger - (IM) Technology that enables users to instantly communicate with other connected users in an interactive message format.

Internet - A global network connecting millions of computers and other networks.

Internet cell phones - Recently developed cellular phones that are web and e-mail enabled.

Internet Explorer - The web browser software created and distributed for free by Microsoft Corp.

Internet Service Provider (ISP) - The company or entity that provides a path to the Internet (Internet access) for its users

Intranets - A restricted access network that operates on web technology - usually on a closed corporate network.

ISP - (Internet Service Provider)The company or entity that provides a path to the Internet (Internet access) for its users.

J

jpeg (jpg) - Short for Joint Photographic Experts Group, and pronounced jay-peg. JPEG is a compression technique for color images. Although it can reduce file sizes to about 5% of their normal size, some detail is lost in the compression.

K

Killer Application - When an application of a new technology becomes so widely accepted as to cause a massive paradigm shift, this is often called a Killer Application.

L

Laser printer - A printer that uses a laser and dry toner to burn the printed image onto the page.

Learning curve - The amount of time and energy that must be invested before a technology is mastered.

Library of the world - The concept that the Internet offers the world community all of the collective knowledge of the world. In reality, this is not the case, but there is more information available through the Internet than through any other venue.

License period - The length of time that a particular domain name is licensed to a domain name holder (registrant).

Link - A link embedded in a message or in a document that will, when clicked, transport the user to another location or will activate a program. AKA hyperlink, hotlink.

Linking - A link embedded in a message or in a document that will, when clicked, transport the user to another location or will activate a program.

List Owner - Also called Listserv Administrator - the people or entity responsible for the management, posting and adherence to established guidelines for a Listserv.

Listserv - Mailing list software LISTSERV, a product of L-Soft international, Inc. The term has become generic, to a great degree, being used to describe mail-list discussions and list discussion software.

Listservs/Mailing lists - Those mailing lists in which the participants share a common ground (same business, etc.) and they come together through e-mail discussions using technologies like Listserv®.

Lurk - To belong to a Listserv community but refrain from posting.

M

Mail List - Generic term meant to describe a list of names and addresses (in this case, e-mail addresses) used for bulk mailing purposes.

Mailto: - html command that tells the system to open a new e-mail message for the user.

Masking - facility available to a network administrator allowing for further identification within a network. Subnet masking enables the network administrator to further divide the host part of the address into two or more subnets, effectively creating a new "face" for a specific page on the Internet. This is used to give a more meaningful URL to a page on the Web.

Megabytes - Megabyte (1 MB) represents one thousand "K" bytes, or one million bytes. (a byte is 8 bits of information)

Memory card - Recent developments of digital storage devices that allow for large amounts of digital storage on very small devices.

Memory stick - Micro storage devices developed and promoted by Sony Corp. for storage and transfer of digital information from one device to another.

Meta-tags - A special HTML tag that provides information about a Web page.

Microprocessor - The microprocessor handles the logic operations in a computer, such as adding, subtracting, and copying. A set of instructions in the chip design tells the microprocessor what to do, but different applications can give instructions to the microprocessor as well.

Microsoft Internet Explorer - The web browser software created and distributed for free by Microsoft Corp.

Moderated - A Listserv in which all messages pass through the Listserv administrator or manager prior to posting.

Monitor - In this context, a display device (like a television) that enables you to see the output of your computer.

Mouse - The computer device typically used to move the cursor around on the monitor. Mouse buttons are used for selection, action and informational purposes - especially with application programs and the World Wide Web (internet).

.mov - Motion image files requiring Quicktime for Windows

Mpeg (.mpg) - Short for Moving Picture Experts Group, and pronounced m-peg, a working group of ISO. The term also refers to the family of digital video compression standards and file formats developed by the group.

MSIE - Microsoft Internet Explorer - the most widely used web browser.

My Computer icon - A location on the desktop to access dial up networking, printers, available drives, and others.

My Documents - A default folder available in Windows that is usually used for storage of data files.

N

NAR Technology Certification Program - The e-PRO Certification Course.

National ISP - An ISP that offers points of presence (PoP, not to be confused with Post Office Protocol) available through local phone numbers in a majority of US locations.

Needs statement - A written statement that details exactly what you are trying to solve, accomplish, gain.

Netscape - The web browser owned, maintained and made available by AOL.

No-brainer - Something that is a "must do" or requires no thought is said to be a "no-brainer".

Node - An intermediate processing location on a network. Nodes are usually created to group users on a network for resource sharing.

Nodes - In networks, a processing location.

Noise-to-content ratio - The amount of non-essential messages sent through the Listserv. Many participants are too quick to post messages like "I agree with you." or like "Me too." These messages are considered to be noise-level.

NRDS - National REALTORS® Database System - a searchable database system with information on all members of NAR.

O

Offline - Happening or taking place without being connected to the Internet.

Off-list - Communicating directly (without going through the Listserv) with members of a Listserv community.

On the fly - As you go - something that can be changed or created at will and as needed is said to be created on the fly.

Online community - Used in tandem with 'virtual communities' - give people with similar experiences and interests the opportunity to come together online, freed from the restraints of time and space to form relationships.

Online forms - Fill-in-the-blanks forms on web pages that automatically e-mail the user input to the page owner/manager.

Operating System - The software that communicates with the computer processor in machine-readable code. The instruction set and rules under which all application software operates.

Opt-in - Offering users a way to subscribe to your mailing list.

Opt-out - Offering the recipients of an e-mail marketing message an easy way to unsubscribe.

P

Packets - A piece of a message transmitted over a packet-switching network.

Paradigm - The common set of beliefs, theories and examples that define how subscribers view a specific topic or dogma.

Paradigm shift - A paradigm is a set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them. Any sudden and large change to a paradigm is usually called a paradigm shift.

Park - Temporarily locating your domain name on a server until you decide where it will ultimately reside.

Password protected - A site that restricts entry to those who have the correct password.

PDA/Handheld - Term currently interchangeable with Palmtop Device. Refers to those computing devices that are small enough to fit the palm of your hand. This is now expanded to include sub-notebook computers.

Permanent e-mail address - An e-mail address that is derived by owning and controlling your own domain name. You can use the e-mail services of the domain host to point mail to and from this domain regardless of your actual ISP. By doing this, you no longer need to change e-mail.

Permanent web site address - The use of and control of your own domain name for web site URLs, including but not limited to your main site and any and all pointer domains.

Permission marketing - Marketing to those who have given their permission - usually through an opt-in message or a field on a form.

Personal Information Management - Programs that are designed to assist the user in management of contacts, appointments, activities, documents, notes and more.

Personal Technology Audit - The process used to determine an individual's baseline technology skill set.

Personal Technology Plan of Action - Step-by-step plan designed to take one's business from a starting point to a state of proficiency in targeted technologies. This plan will define investment required, learning curve, resources and people needed to become technologically competitive.

Photo editing - Software that enables the user to make often sophisticated changes to digital images - such as sharpen, resize, recolor, and much more. Adobe Photo Shop is a really great program for this.
PIM - Personal Information Manager - Programs that are designed to assist the user in management of contacts, appointments, activities, documents, notes and more.

PIN - Personal Identification Number - your unique identifying number for security purposes, as used in banking and other applications.

Ping - Short for Packet Internet Groper, a utility to determine whether a specific IP address is accessible. Ping is used to check Internet connections by sending a packet to a server several times, testing the connection and response times.

Plain Text - ASCII standard text - non-formatted text.

Point-and-click - User interface in which a user typically points to an object on the screen and then clicks a button on the mouse to take an action or to move to another location (as in hypertext).

Pointer domains - In this context, a pointer domain is a domain name that is used to point to the main domain. Many organizations have registered multiple variations of their domain name (including misspellings) which they then point to their base domain name through the use of pointers or redirects.

POP Account - Post Office Protocol account - enabling the user to receive e-mail.

POPs - Post Office Protocol servers.

Pop-up window - A window that appears within another window and provides information or advertising.

Portals - A "door" or entry point to a wide-ranging variety of web sites. Used in the real estate context, a real estate portal offers a repository of industry-related web links that provide single-click access to many real estate web sites.

Post - To compose an e-mail message and send it to a Listserv for distribution to the group.

Post information - Cause information (data) to become part of a database or data file.

Privacy statement - The written stated practices of a web site or web company that specifies the degree of privacy and confidentiality the company or site owners will apply to the protection of the private and personal information of its users and visitors.

Protocol - A predetermined and common format for transmitting data from one point (computer, network, user, device) to another.

Push - Internet terminology used to refer to the act of putting information in front of the user - often through automated electronic communications, including e-mail newsletters, html-based e-mail and web clipping.

Q

.qt - QuickTime is a method of storing sound, graphics, and movie files (see .mov)

Quantummail.com - An online mailing service with real estate-specific products.

R

Real estate professionals - Those who derive their primary income from a real estate business. Licensed sales people and brokers whose primary income is derived from the real estate business working full time as a career. This does not include part time agents who work here and there.

Real time - When something is happening on an interactive basis (action now, result now) it is often called real-time.

Real Talk Digests - The Real Talk Listserv as delivered in digest format.

Re-directing e-mail - A mail server function that enables you to automatically redirect (reflect) e-mail sent to one address to another address of your choosing.

Referring agents - Agents from one geographic location or who specialize in a particular practice, referring a prospective customer to real estate professionals in another location or having another specialization - often for a predetermined fee.

Registrant - The company or entity requesting the registration of a particular domain name.

Registrar - The company or entity granted the rights to register domain names.

Registrars - Those companies and entities granted rights to assign domain names within a TLD.

Registry Key - A unique identifier that enables the holder to make changes to a domain registration.

Registry key number - Unique number assigned to a registered domain registration.

Resolutions - The density/quality of the display on the monitor - usually measured in 'pixels per inch'.

RETS - The Real Estate Transaction Standard (RETS) is the new open standard for exchanging real estate transaction information. Consisting of a transaction specification and a standard Extensible Markup Language (XML) Document Type Definition (DTD), RETS is being implemented by many real estate industry leaders in their next generation of real estate information systems.

Rich Text Format - The Rich Text Format (RTF) standard is a method of encoding formatted text and graphics for easy transfer between MS-DOS, Windows, Windows 95, OS/2, and Apple Macintosh applications.

Right click - Pressing the mouse's right button to access commands.

Risk reduction technique - Any activity or technique that reduces the professional's exposure to liability for his actions, errors or omissions.

Robotics - Robots - computerized devices that can react to sensory-like input - are widely used in manufacturing to perform precise and repetitive tasks.

Root Servers - A computer or device on a network that manages network resources.

Router - On the Internet, a router is a device (or, in some cases, software in a computer) that determines the next network point to which a packet should be forwarded toward its destination. A router maintains a table of the available routes and their conditions and uses this information--along with distance and cost algorithms--to determine the best route for a given packet. Typically, a packet may travel through a number of network points with routers before arriving at its destination.

Routing - The process of moving a packet of data from source to destination.

Rules - Those standards established in the e-mail client for automatic handling of incoming messages based on predetermined conditions.

S

Satellite - Short for Internet over Satellite, IoS technology allows a user to access the Internet via a satellite that orbits the Earth.

Scanner - A device that can read text or illustrations printed on paper and translate the information into a form the computer can use.

Screen capture - Use of technologies designed to make a photo-like image of the computer screen's contents.

Search engines - A program that searches documents for specified keywords and returns a list of the documents where the keywords were found.

Second Level Domains - That unique name (Domain Name) that identifies a particular computer or network on the Internet. It is the unique name assigned within a Domain (I.e. eProNAR.com) and is registered with the Domain Registry.

Server - A computer or device on a network that manages network resources.

Shrink-wrapped - Refers to traditional manufacturing process that results in a product in a shrink-wrapped box.

Signature - A text file that you append to your messages, containing static information - including name, e-mail address, telephone information etc.

Site management software - Software that automates the creation and maintenance of a web site.

SMTP - Simple Mail Transfer Protocol - the standard e-mail transmission protocol for the Internet.

SMTP server - Simple Mail Transfer Protocol server - that server software that manages all outgoing e-mail from users.

Source code - The code that defines a web page - html, dhtml, asp, php, cold fusion others. Program instructions in their original form.

SPAM - Internet junk mail. Unsolicited e-mail.

Speed - Measured by the amount of time data can be uploaded and downloaded by a user.

Sphere of Influence - Those people in your circle of friends, family, associates and others with whom you are in contact with. 

Standard buttons - The basic set of features - represented by toolbar buttons – that should be available in order to navigate through the internet.

Stitched/Stitching - Joining of two or more digital images at common points to create a single contiguous image.

Streaming video - A method of making large-file video available via the Internet in which the video starts to play while the rest of it downloads in a continuous stream.

Strip headers - To remove or otherwise invalidate the header information from the source code of a web page.

Structures - In this context, the design, data fields and order of data in a given application system.

Subscribe - Add users to your recipient list so that they will begin receiving your mailings on an ongoing basis.

Surf - Navigation almost at random through a series of web links, from one document or site to another.

Surge protector - Electrical connectors and extension cords that reduce the amount of electrical surges and spikes that can harm sophisticated electronic circuitry.

Switching facility - Also called the Central Office Location in a DSL system.

Symmetric DSL - A digital Subscriber line in which the same data rates exist for both upstream and downstream traffic.

Synchronization - Bringing the content of two devices into parity. Refers to the process of bringing all common data current between the handheld and the desktop/laptop computers.

Synchronizing data - Bringing the content of two devices into parity. Refers to the process of bringing all common data current between the handheld and the desktop computers.

Synergy - The interaction of two or more agents or forces so that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects.

T

Tablet PC - A type of notebook computer that has an LCD screen on which the user can write using a special-purpose pen, or stylus. The handwriting is digitized and can be converted to standard text through handwriting recognition, or it can remain as handwritten text. The stylus also can be used to type on a pen-based key layout where the lettered keys are arranged differently than a QWERTY keyboard. Tablet PCs also typically have a keyboard and/or a mouse for input.

TCP/IP - Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol - TCP enables two hosts to establish a connection and exchange streams of data. TCP guarantees delivery of data and also guarantees that packets will be delivered in the same order in which they were sent.

Technology Investment - The amount of time, effort and resources required to become proficient in those technologies that add value to one's business or services.

Technology learning curve - The amount of time and effort required to go from a position of no knowledge to a position of proficiency with any technology tool (hardware, software or peripheral).

Technology Plan of Action - A stated plan for adding technology solutions to your real estate, or any other, business.

Text size - Text is measured in font sizes as represented by the number of 'points' a character will have in height. The more points, the larger the text.

The New Real Estate Industry - A marked change in the residential real estate industry, brought about by increased consumer access to information and supportive tools by consumers.

Third Level Domains - The owner of an SLD (Domain Name) has the ability to assign specific groupings within that domain name for categorical purposes. This can apply as in the case of e-mail addresses (JohnSmith@eProNAR.com with John Smith being the third-level) or in web page groupings (as in Community.eProNAR.com) where the community pages can be segmented to allow tighter access control and for other reasons.

Thread - An electronic discussion that takes the form of "Message-Reply-Reply" in a threaded conversational manner.

Throughput - Data transfer rates - i.e. the amount of data sent to a point in a given amount of time - usually measured Kbytes, Megabytes or Gigabytes per second.

Timeout - Systems often log out or shut down after a specified period of inactivity. This is called a timeout.

TLD - Top Level Domain: identifies the most general part of the domain name in an Internet address. A TLD is either a generic top-level domain, such as "com" for "commercial," "edu" for "educational," and so forth, or a country code top-level domain, such as "fr" for France.

Tutorials - Interactive learning tools - learn by example.

U

Ubiquitous - Occurring in many disparate locations at the same time. Seeming to be everywhere at once.

Unique name - Within a TLD (.com, .org, .gov, .tv, .edu, etc.) there can only be one registration of any specific domain name. As an example, there can only be one REALTOR.com, but there can also be one REALTOR.org.

Universal fonts - Fonts that are available to most computer users. This usually includes Arial, Times, Times New Roman, Courier and Serif.

Unix - A popular multi-user, multi-tasking operating system developed at Bell Labs in the early 1970s.

URL - Uniform (or Universal) Resource Locator - URLs are the Internet equivalent of addresses. Your web site's location on the Internet is found through the use of a URL.

User name - The unique name that identifies a specific user within a certain domain. In the example JohnSmith@eProNAR.com, John Smith is the user name.

V

Vacation Message - An auto-reply that you set in your e-mail system to go out to people sending you messages while you are out of the office. Usually, it will send a message only once to each person.

VCard - An electronic business card for use in e-Mail authentication, infrared beaming and more.

View - Setting up your software so that it presents only those functions that you wish to see at a given time.

Virtual post office - This refers to those facilities offered by a host that enable the user to send and receive e-mail and to control how e-mail is handled.

Virtual tour technology - Use of panoramic stitched photography to allow web surfers to experience the feeling of actually being in a location (i.e. in a house).

Virtual tours - Recent advance in digital photography where one digital picture is "stitched" to one or more other digital pictures at common points to create a continuous 360 degree view.

W

Wave (.wav) - The format for storing sound in files developed jointly by Microsoft and IBM.

Web editing - Creation of pages, hyperlinks and tools for a web site.

Web host - Making facilities available for location of web pages and web services.

Web interface - An interface to a program or programs that offers the user point-and-click actions, usually through hypertext.

Web Mail - Web services that allow the user to manage e-mail from a web page. This can include send, receive, store and forward.

Web presence - The total marketing effort, including and emphasizing branding, you invest using the World Wide Web, including web sites, reciprocal linking and more.

Web response forms - Fill-in-the-blanks forms on web pages that automatically e-mail the user input to the page owner/manager.

Web site requests - Calls to your domain from user action on web sites. This can include incoming links as well as incoming e-mail and more.

Web-based photo storage - Web services that offer space and tools for you to upload your digital photos, making them available for your friends, family, associates and clients to see.

Web-on-the-fly - Tools that enable non-technical users to create sophisticated web sites by selecting from menus of content and then adding their unique information.

Whois - A unique database search facility that enables one to look up a domain registration record to determine ownership.

Windows for Pocket PC - Microsoft's current OS for handheld devices that uses and emulates some of the features of Windows - allowing the user to have familiar MS Office tools in a handheld configuration.

Windows Operating System - The operating system developed and supported by Microsoft Corp. The most widely used OS for personal computers.

Windows® - Popular operating systems for personal computing developed and maintained by Microsoft Corp.

Wireless communications - Transmissions that do not require physical wire-line connections.

Wireless e-mail - Recent developments in the pager and PDA realms allow for wireless access to e-mail through devices such as the Blackberry e-mail device, the Novatel wireless modem, cellular telephones and more.

Word - Microsoft Corp's premiere word processing software.

World Wide Web - A navigational and multimedia-based presentation protocol that enables users to jump from one point on a document to another point on a document or another document (on the same server or on a different server attached to the Internet) through the use of hypertext transfer protocol (http). Users click on hyperlinks to activate the navigation, thus creating a random navigation path at runtime.

WOW factor - How much excitement an item generates based on its technology, looks and price.

Z

Zip files - Files that have been compressed by removing non-essential bits, such as zeros and blanks. Further compression is attained through a 'sampling' algorithm that strips bits on a predetermined frequency.

Other

24/7/365 - 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, 365 days per year
2mbps - 2,000,000 bytes per second data speed
500 kbps - 500,000 bytes per second data speed
56K - 56 thousand. Usually refers to a modem

Tech Glossary Provided By e-Pro

 

 

If you would like to exchange links with this site the please do the following:

1. Click on "Select Banner Code" and copy and paste the code below into your website.
2. Send us an email with the link to the page on your site showing our link.
Select Banner Code  


Warm regards,

Team Enterprise
Matt Larsen & Richard Buijs.
Your Bay Area Professionals!

(510) 233.5333 X 135 Office
info@teamenterprise.com
    Matt direct (510) 415.2458
Richard direct (510) 847.3924

877-510-EXIT (3948) toll free

Learning from the past, Working in the present, Planning for the future!

Call Team Enterprise 1st! We'll Open Doors For You!
 
 
Privacy Policy  |  Real Estate Resources  |  Site  Disclaimer  |  Site Map | Bay Area Real Estate |© Team Enterprise Inc. All Rights Reserved.